Sask. man says critics of immigration 'have no clue what they're talking about'

Ponziano Aluma's journey to Canada was arduous.

Aluma fled Uganda and spent six years in a refugee camp in South Sudan before coming to Regina in January 1987. He was forced to leave behind family members living and dead.

His wife had died giving birth at the refugee camp. Their child died soon after. Their memories haunted him long after he arrived at his new home.

Aluma's physical journey was only the beginning of the full process of immigration.

He is one of millions of immigrants who have come to the country, according to Statistics Canada, which says more than 17 million people have immigrated here since 1867.

Immigration remains a contentious political issue. Anti-immigration movements are sweeping across the nation.

Aluma said those movements are driven by emotion, not fact.

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'Life and death' appeal of Sask. Catholic school ruling to be heard

The appeal of a landmark 2017 ruling that said the Saskatchewan government can't pay for non-Catholic kids to attend Catholic schools is coming before the province's highest court this week.

The catalyst for the case came more than a decade ago in Theodore — a rural village about 40 kilometres northwest of Yorkton.

In 2003, the public school division that served the area, Good Spirit, decided it was no longer feasible to keep the village school open. It closed the school and wanted to bus the 42 students about 17 kilometres to the town of Springside.

Parents in Theodore were not impressed.  A group of Roman Catholics used provisions in the Education Act of 1995 and petitioned the Minister of Education to form Theodore Roman Catholic School Division — which is now part of Christ the Teacher Roman Catholic Separate School Division (CTT). 

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Mickey Gower, 99, likes to win

Muriel "Mickey" Gower was surefooted as she sent a red stone down the curling sheet, using a friend's delivery stick to help with the shot.

A shadow of disappointment broke through the 99-year-old's confident expression as she chided the rock for not spinning enough before grabbing another.

"I like to win, but I'm a good loser," she often says.

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Reconciliation amid racism: Is it possible on the Prairies?

Max FineDay felt an unspeakable rage and an overwhelming sorrow when Gerald Stanley walked free from the courthouse in Battleford, Sask., earlier this year.

Stanley fatally shot 22-year-old Colten Boushie in August 2016 on his farm in the Biggar, Sask., area. In February, the white Saskatchewan farmer was acquitted of second-degree murder in the death of the Cree man.

FineDay travelled home to the Sweetgrass First Nation in Saskatchewan to speak to his elders after the verdict was announced.

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Let it Shine

Arrows drawn in coloured chalk adorn a sidewalk that winds past a teepee and between trees toward Luther College at the University of Regina. At the end of the chalk rainbow road is a message: Welcome to Camp fYrefly. We love you.

Inside, Jolie Brewer BEd’12 runs her hand through her short rainbow-coloured hair. She apologizes for her tears …

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Crisis Interrupted

Kamsack’s main street is typical of a small Saskatchewan town. There’s a Canada Post, a few four-way stops, a couple of banks and a Home Hardware.

The community is quiet, aside from two bustling pharmacies that stand less than a block from one another.

The dozens of methadone doses the pharmacies dispense daily hint at the lurking opioid crisis affecting townspeople and members of three nearby First Nations.

Frontline workers witness disturbing, widespread patterns tied to addictions: child apprehension, domestic violence, homelessness, drug trafficking-related crime and prostitution.

They also see prevailing stigma surrounding substance abuse in the town of less than 2,000.

But positive patterns are starting to shine through, as stories of recovery and resistance emerge.

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Sask. man prepares for emotional farewell to dad's antique automobile collection

It's the end of an era for the Gervais family. 

Several dozen antique vehicles are neatly lined up on the family's expansive farmyard, about 10 kilometres north of Alida, Sask., and around 230 kilometres southeast of Regina.

Come Sunday evening, the relics should be claimed and the fields will be close to empty, save for what isn't snatched up by shoppers on site.

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Who is there? Meet the people of the Indigenous protest camp

A painful anniversary is approaching for Soolee Papequash. 

On July 18 it will have been three years since her son Brandon died. She is reminded of him as she sits with other parents — many who have experienced their own form of loss — at the Justice for our Stolen Children camp set up in Regina across from the Saskatchewan Legislature.

"I don't want to be at home, so I come here for my comfort zone," she said. Her son died in what Papequash said was labelled an accidental overdose.

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Family Finds Light in Dark Times

I left Shaunavon before sunrise and headed south-west on the Red Coat Trail. The Frenchman river wound through the hills alongside the narrow gravel road I travelled. I was on my way to meet Anne Arnal at 8 a.m. near the small community of Ravenscrag.

The roads were empty of traffic until a young bull crossed the road. I edged the car forward. The moose galloped strangely in a circle and then sauntered down into the ditch. Anne was patiently waiting at the junction in her vehicle. I tailed her to the family farm, envying her effortless navigation of loose gravel.

We waded through mewing cats to get into the house. The large home felt empty …

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